101 Ways to Reuse Baby Wipes Containers!

101 Ways to Reuse Baby Wipes Containers

Years ago, I wrote two posts about reusing those plastic boxes baby wipes come in (50 Uses for Those Rectangular Baby Wipes Containers! and 25 MORE Uses for Baby Wipes Containers). To this day, they are still my most popular posts. I decided to revisit these posts and see if I could come up with even more ideas for reusing baby wipes containers. These boxes (and the wipes in them) are so versatile, I just love them! My babies are closer to the tween years than infanthood, but we still use wipes all the time. If you don’t like the plastic baby look, just grab some decorative duct tape, washi tape or even fabric scraps to dress them up! In the comments, I’d love to hear your best ideas for reusing these organizing gems!

  1. Travel case for your kid’s Nintendo DS, charger and games (or other personal game system)
  2. Sports day kit, for toting to your son or daughter’s soccer/baseball/volleyball/lacrosse games: small first aid kit, energy bar and juice box, extra baby wipes, sunscreen
  3. Storing birthday party cake supplies, such as extra candles, cupcake liners, color icing writing tubes
  4. As an inconspicuous place to store valuables. Would a thief think to look in the baby wipes container?
  5. Storing Cub Scout award cards, belt loops and pins
  6. Travel case for all your son’s action figures
  7. Barbie’s wardrobe (and shoe!) storage
  8. Extra ink jet toner cartridges
  9. Essential oil storage
  10. If you’re an EO fan like me, you can store your extra roller balls, mixing bottles and spray tops for making essential oil blends.
  11. Storing kids’ sticker sheets and temporary tattoos
  12. Add wheels to make a car perfect for your toddler to play with. Bonus — she can store other small toys inside and take her car on-the-go!
  13. Containing rubber band bracelet supplies — those little rubber bands go everywhere!
  14. Travel box for swim goggles and dive sticks
  15. Baby snack box — you can fit a couple of jars of baby food, spoon, baggie of Cheerios
  16. Good Behavior Reward Box — gather up small toys, candy or coupons for special treats and let your child choose from the box as a reward
  17. Storing beads, elastic, charms and tools for making jewelry
  18. Add padding to store an extra DSLR camera lens dust free
  19. Hold fabric swatches and paint samples when redecorating
  20. Keep track of extra SD memory cards and flash drives
  21. Store extra lids for your mason jars
  22. Corral extra buttons and thread samples from new clothing
  23. Keep track of alphabet magnets, flash cards, number counters or other small educational tools
  24. Coupon storage box
  25. Recipe organizer
  26. Crayon catch-all (perfect for broken crayons)
  27. Small kitchen utensils
  28. Art supplies and clay
  29. Small cars and trucks
  30. Lego storage — especially good for making an on-the-go Lego box for trips to the grandparents’ house or keeping small sets together
  31. Cosmetics organizer — storing either daily use make-up, extra supplies, or create kits for different looks
  32. Sewing kit
  33. Organizing gravy and sauce packets in the pantry
  34. Organizing tea bags or drink mixes in the pantry
  35. Treasure Chest project
  36. Stacking blocks
  37. Clothes pin storage
  38. First aid kit
  39. Organizing hair bows, barrettes and ponytail holders
  40. Keeping track of those Bills To Pay
  41. Storing baby and toddler spoons and utensils
  42. Organizing small lids and containers
  43. Holding travel-size shampoos and soaps
  44. Pen and pencil case
  45. Organizing baby’s grooming supplies — combs, clippers, nasal bulb thingys
  46. Organizing charging cords for your small electronics
  47. Travel toy/activity box for car trips
  48. Holding baby washcloths
  49. Storing your own DIY cleaning wipes
  50. Manicure kit — store your nail clippers, files, nail polish and toe separators
  51. Holding small tools or a emergency tool kit
  52. Storing screws, nails and fasteners
  53. Storing dog supplies — brushes, clippers, collars, dog waste bags
  54. Storing kitty supplies — brush, nail clippers, collar, small toys, catnip
  55. Snack case for car trips
  56. Organizing trading cards or baseball cards
  57. Corraling random craft supplies
  58. Using as a brick mold for making snow forts
  59. Organizing seed packets for planting season
  60. Tissue storage in the car
  61. Pet food travel box
  62. Dry storage boxes on boats
  63. Dry storage boxes at the pool
  64. Storing gift bows crush-free
  65. School/daycare projects (ask your teachers!)
  66. Storage for leftovers or lunch (clean well first!)
  67. Dryer sheet storage — keeps that fresh aroma in until you’re ready to release it
  68. Outlet covers — just add a couple of screw holes and mount over outlet
  69. Yarn/skein holders for knitters — the yarn can be guided through the pop-up part
  70. Recycling plastic bags — pull a bag out through the hole to reuse plastic bags
  71. Seed starter pots
  72. Piggy bank
  73. Hermit crab hideaway — make sure to drill a few air holes
  74. Photo box
  75. Storing toddler dental supplies (toothbrush, toothpaste, floss, timer)
  76. Storing cassette tapes or mini-DV tapes for your old video camera
  77. Organizing garage sale stuff like pricing labels, batteries, small extension cord for testing appliances
  78. A cash box for your garage sale or Girl Scout cookie sale
  79. Holding condiments, utensils, napkins and other small dining supplies in your desk drawer at work
  80. Holding reusable cleaning rags
  81. Storing kids’ puzzles after the box breaks
  82. Storing pieces for board games
  83. Closet emergency kit — fill with a small sewing kit, double-sided tape, safety pins, a lint brush and static spray for wardrobe mishaps
  84. Shoe polishing kit — fill with shoe polish, rags and brushes, leather wipes and deodorizing spray for keeping your shoes fresh
  85. Storing office supplies such as paper clips, binder clips, extra staples, erasers, you name it
  86. Touch-up paint kit — keep small jars of touch-up wall paint and small paint brushes for easy wall upkeep
  87. Home repair kit — keep a screwdriver, screws and nails, a small hammer, picture hangers, and other small items for doing minor home repairs on the fly
  88. Store your iPhone, iPod, cell phone or other mp3 player supplies — extra cases, charging cords, earphones
  89. Child’s treasure box — kids like to collect little treasures everywhere they go — let them store in something small so the collection doesn’t get out of hand
  90. Organize notepads, Post-its and pens for your message center
  91. Store extra keys — but label them first!
  92. Containing extra sewing machines parts and maintenance pieces
  93. Store extra votive and tea light candles
  94. Storing baby socks
  95. Organizing scrapbooking supplies — keep pens, glue, stickers, tape wheels, precut lettering and decor, scissors, diecuts, etc.
  96. Storing baby’s supplies — petroleum jelly, diaper cream, lotion
  97. Holding all those extra business cards
  98. Storing stuff for your gym locker — padlock, deodorant, comb, hair bands, extra socks
  99. Collecting bottle tops until you can finally enter all those Coke codes
  100. You can corral 2 Wii nun-chucks or 2 Wii remotes with sleeves in one box.
  101. Car kit — store a packet of wipes, a few granola bars, lens cleaning cloths, your sunglasses, parking money, tissues, phone chargers and anything else you need on the go.

Keep It Simple, Silly: Kissing Drudgery Goodbye

Keep It Simple Silly: Kissing Drudgery Goodbye

March is turning out to be a very wet month here in North Texas. Ice, then rain, then ice, then snow, then more rain. My backyard is a swamp right now. Having just returned home from a quick road trip, my minivan was coated in road gunk and mud, and you could barely see out the driver side window anymore. The forecast for the week is warm and drier, but today, it’s pouring rain. Again. So I did what any water-conserving lunatic would do.

I bundled up in my boots and rain coat and went outside to wash my minivan.

I’m sure the neighbors thought I was crazy, backing the van out of the warm, dry garage into the driveway, letting it get good and soaked, and then trudging out there with a large dog bowl full of water and a few drops of earth-friendly soap and a large sponge to wipe the mud off the van. Did I mention I was still wearing bright red pajama pants under the raincoat? Why not get the muddy, wet chore out of the way before my nice hot shower? I know how to schedule these things!

What started off as a little “let me see if I can save myself a trip to the car wash this week” experiment turned into pure fun when I realized I was giggling like a child, soaping up my dirty minivan with an oversize sponge while rain poured on my head. The rain rinsed the mud away almost as fast as I could scrub it, which made the whole process very satisfying. A few neighbors pulled down the alley and paused to gawk at me out there scrubbing away, but I didn’t care. It only took 10 minutes to get the van clean, and I never had to waste a drop of water from the hose.

Sometimes, just by looking at the situation a little differently, you can find ways to bring fun to everyday drudgery. Washing a muddy car in the rain. Sliding damp towels around a dirty floor with your feet to “mop” to the beat of your favorite song. Practicing your three-point shooting skills when tossing laundry into the hamper. Racing to finish a chore during the commercial breaks of your favorite guilty-pleasure TV show.

What chore can you make fun today?